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environment is nothing to complain about. >> and what about the personal and commercial banking business, one of the biggest segments of what you guys do. what kind of demand trends are you seeing? >> well, again, there's clearly a slow down on the consumer side, but we're coming off, you know, double digit growth rates, and we're now moving into midsingle digit growth rates. part half is intended. our government has taken an approach to try to slow down consumer debt levels and it's having an impact which i say is a good thing. when you look at loan demand on the commercial side, it remains very strong. as i say, investment demand, deposit demand has been very good. so when you look at the overall platform, it grew at 7% this year -- or this past quarter over quarter, and so it's a slightly slower environment, but as i say not all that bad. >> i mean, we talk about the good quarter you just completed, but you've had a good year at rbc, but don't you feel like the easy money, to use that term, is done now? you guys are going to have to work a little harder to keep that growth rate going, don'
, effectively? >> well, it's hard. it's going to be a significant trading range environment. the market will correct back on a repeating basis. we'll get a period where the market doesn't accomplish a heck of a lot. that's all you should expect. >> you watched janet yellen yesterday. did he provide the confidence that you would have wanted? and the reason i ask is because historically, if you just do the math, every time we get a new chair in this role, we usually have some form of a correction within six months. and the question that i keep wondering is whether we have that correction or it's still to come. >> i think, you know, investors tend to react to the unexpected, not the expected. and yesterday, the messaging was steady as she goes. so i think for now, we're in good shape. the march meeting, unless data falls off the cliff, investors will expect and will treat another $10 billion in tapering to occur. so i think we hand off from bernanke to yellen in this case may be a little different. because she was pretty much on tune with the dovishness of the fed and there hasn't been a f
-quarter revenue. "turbo" were disappointing. this is the most competitive feature environment he's ever seen. they will withdraw world cup t-shirts after they complained it a link to the country with sexual activity. the world's largest --second-largest sports company said they were only available in the u.s.. >> 643 a.m. in london. brazil is also the king of car crime, bad news for owners but makerews for the israeli of car tracking devices reporting record earnings largely thanks to brazil's auto theft explosion. middle eastern attic or elliott gotkine has more. with theen speaking chief executive? >> their biggest market thanks to this explosion of auto theft, brazil is just as important. of 10,000 vehicles are stolen, 40% worse than the second worst country, south africa. the chief executive says it will continue to be a very good market for them. very attractive to us because of two main reasons. brazil is becoming a more western company. more insurance companies are involved in more car manufacturers are involved. more people are using cars. on the other hand, still emerging markets. ,
, radio shack had a tough time in that environment, 4.5%, cutting the management they don't need, and earnings per share beating profit on a ride so sales were still little tricky but stock is doing well. adam: the s and p is on track for record close and the dow is climbing back from earlier losses, 35 points, mixed economic news. turmoil in ukraine, testimony on the hill, an opportunity to address concerns regarding recent soft economic data. >> since my appearance before the house committee on number of data releases point to softer spending. part of that softness may reflect weather conditions. is difficult to discern how much. adam: joining us is oppenheimer funds chief economist, how much of a player is the weather in the south economic data? >> they asked me to come back in april or may and i will tell you. if you didn't buy a house you didn't buy a car because of a blizzard, you might buy it later on. you didn't go out to dinner, that is pretty much spending this law so it is hard to say i was looking at history of past times, got a fight after a particularly bad winters,
to run my state the bay i want to. let me make the environment such that i can promote jobs in my own state. i don't need the federal government doing this for me. >> but i think you need to look at the entire tax code. do you realize -- >> but you shouldn't be paying 15% when people making less than you are paying a higher rate. >> but if i -- >> that nibt be the case for you. you pit it in harm's way, you're investing it? >> that's another way to say it. >> depending on what you're doing could be putting it in harm's way to lose it. >> put in bitcoins. >> but when you're putting other people's money in harm's way, this goes back to what we talked about before, as the private equity manager, why is that -- why is that the not a commission oriented business? >> when you see somebody make $500 million of which a large portion of it is in carried pictures. that's what private equity is. i redeploy it all the time. i'm constantly buying new deals. why would you want me to stop doing that? >> it's not a matter of punishing you. it's a matter of giving you special status. and i'm not argui
promise to keep it that way. driven to preserve the environment, csx moves a ton of freight nearly 450 miles on one gallon of fuel. what a day. can't wait til tomorrow. ♪ but if you cholose your eyes does it always feel like nothing's aged at all ♪ ♪ and if you close your eyes does it almost feel like ♪ >>> time now for cramer and "stop trading" jim. >> the idea that craft beer may have peaked and going back to buds, people are bud izzing abo that. boston beer numbers is not what we expected, this sam. and anheuser-busch, inbev, grade number turnaround in brazil and mexico, huge places that drink beer. is it a trend that can continue? if boston beer wants to spend less money they can show better gross margins. but this deal worked out. and worked out for constellation. the beer market's good. i don't want to make too much of the idea that craft beer has peaked but people will reach that conclusion. >> spirits taking a lot of share overall. >> diagio reported a quarter that was not so hot and the stock came back. if people want to take a real close look at boston beer they're no
to incentives and health systems incentive changes, to less expensive environments that include clinics and home care. we're in the midst of a big transition overall. >> what is it that your company does exactly when you go in and try and streamline things? >> we're a performance improvement company that focuses on cost, in other words, how you procure all products. we have a $5 billion procurement business that helps hospitals buy what they buy, more importantly, how they use the products. there's a best practice out there but it's not used across the country. we take the process to what we know as best practices. >> you're trying to get people paid quicker, right? i mean, there's a million places to attack. are there too many -- what are your two or three primary ways of doing it? you can get bogged down being all things to all people. >> hospitals aline are over a trillion dollars vertically integrated in 5,000 locations, all very complex and all very different. we focus on cost reduction, clinical integration and payment and price integration so that what's being paid for the services render
to keep it that way. driven to preserve the environment, csx moves a ton of freight nearly 450 miles on one gallon of fuel. what a day. can't wait til tomorrow. liz: shares of best buy on the move to be profit expectations lee janzen analyst at janney montgomery scott, you were on a conference, what did you hear that surprise you? >> 18 months ago this country everyone thought was going out of business, actually argued today. and hybrid models are out there that the investments they make, the ones they're working on, making tough to compete with online. liz: will they have o downstairs' their retail store even more? >> they have markets where they have more density of stores than they need and over time it is inevitable that will happen. there taking hours out of the store because 12% of their business is now online. some productivity you don't need as much investment in energy and a. liz: the chart looks negative, the stock fell off a cliff. you sound positive. is there an opportunity? >> it is an opportunity. proof of concept will come in queue 4. even though they had lower number
at morgan stanley is still bullish, saying look, in this type of environment it's all about growth, even though you do have some big valuations in certain sectors within tech. that's where the growth is and that's where you see investors going and particularly on a day like today, they are flocking towards a tech-heavy nasdaq index. >> understandably so. thanks, sheila. appreciate it very much. >>> the dow is having its best day of the year. we are up almost 218 points on the trading session. now bob pisani is here. it's lifting almost all boats today. >> that's right. earlier today it was ten to one advancing to declining stocks. relief rally's a good way to describe this given what happened yesterday and the strength of the rally. midcap, historic high. small cap, russell 2000 at an historic high. the volatility in the vix, remember yesterday it went from 14 to 16? it went back down to 14 today, indication that tensions are easing. we don't know why. it was always unclear what the military action would be. it seems very clear we don't know what's going to happen but tanks are not going
is already baked in? >> the obamacare regulatory environment is one element of the change in health care where the cost of health care will continue to go up and software is a fundamental way to address that. we have been very active selling companies to the larger participants as they look to build up rotter solutions. >> what other subsectors of tax are hot right now? >> infrastructure software broadly. like sapy solutions and oracle. i think you can see companies like ca trying to change itself or companies that have gone private that are trying to transform companies to deliver solutions into the small and medium-size companies in the marketplace. >> one of the stocks we like to talk about is tesla. morgan stanley doubled their price target. would you buy tesla? >> i'm a technology banker and a big car guy, so i love the stock, does it have the chops to develop the solutions that? that is an unknown. it's interesting at risk dollars that may lay out in a big way or may not. it?ould you buy >> no. >> a lot of analysts still have a bye on it. we are on the market again and 30 minutes.
into cyclicals as we go forward at a low inflationary environment with the fed struggling. sgr >> financials were getting a little bit of a bid. maybe it was a rotation out of the over valued names. want to go back to the main point as we head into the close close. the dow is off almost 250 points. >> bear in mind, 1848 for ages, for weeks and weeks we were trying to break through the new highs, 1848. stutter steps, we finally got there then 1850 would sas resis. finally yesterday we were decisively over that. you get these stutter steps up and back. it's not -- it hasn't been a straight line up but so far since the end of january, we've been doing pretty well. february was a great month. >> the market has been pretty much straight up for the last couple weeks after that big pullback earlier this year, and i think we may be in for some more jitters. i agree with my colleagues here that, you know, some of it has to do with the weekend and the news in the ukraine, but i think there's a lot of geopolitical uncertainty. 21 elections coming up. there may be some excuses for a little pullback. >> subpr
're in this zero interest rate environment among the g-8 in a lot of ways people are stretching to always look for yield, right? and at this point in time there's not much alpha in the fixed income world so it's driving people to always look for that opportunity. i think selectively there are tremendous opportunities in emerging markets. but you have to be careful and do your due dildiligence. >> i imagine you have a number of etfs for that, right? >> we do. and we're very happy about our new etf, too. >> be well. >> pleasure. >>> we are a few days away from jobs friday and, of course, that means another opportunity for you to nail the number and win a prize. tweets your predictions for february nonfarm payrolls. use your handle @squawkstreet and if you win, you'll receive this, cnbc hat signed by the whole "squawk on the street" team. are we going to show a video of it? i guess not. we've got it behind us. we'll sign it right now. back here, yes. very nice. sara's going to put it on right now. >> no, it will ruin my hair. >> the ear flaps will work. >> the producer called it a flapper hat. is
on the environment beyond the end of this term. it's an interesting read. >> fossil fuels, they don't like them. by the way, china in their new five five-year plan, thank you, mao, is talking about environmental cleaner. that's instrumental. you got to be able to gauge the ability to be able to see your feet in the smog there. and i know that that's where the real issues are for global warming. obviously they take our jobs. they do a lot of global warming. but we're worried about keystone. in the meantime the trucks and the trains are going to take it all. they are terrible ways. trains don't use that much pollution, but understand that when warren buffett said it's better, a big pipeline cop,mpany, but burlington northern will be the primary beneficiary so i thought he was unconflicted and also unqualified. >> very nice. down is down 27 or 29 points let's get to bob pisani on the floor. good morning. >> good morning. we started in positive territory on the s&p but we just turned negative and, of course, we were at historic highs not just there but the midcap and small cap in
. this is an environment where companies that don't get busy living, taking action like smart acquisitions, get busy dying. when companies do try to take control of their destinies, that tends to be good news for stocks for shareholders, something i write about in "get rich" carefully. that's why i like thermo fisher so much. i think kind of in arms to biotech and big forma, it provides laboratory customers with everything they need and they have a solid diagnostics division and safety business. the big reason i like the stock, back in april, thermo fisher announced it was buying life technologies for 13.6 billion in a deal that closed last month. that makes they the largest player by far. this is just such a fabulous acquisition. the light deal gives the company a terrific platform, something img poor tablet in a world of genetically platformed medicine and makes it the leader of bio science and processing, two years that help accelerate drug recovery and production. thermo fisher rallied 50% more since the like technology announced last april. talk about getting busy living. the company is doing well fo
party in midterm election and the exception was the 2002 in the post-9/11 environment. the buck is going to stop with the incumbent party in power because america is not happy. i think quite likely the outcome the republicans keep the house and a possibility the republicans will pick up the senate even losing mitch mcconnell's seat. we have to be divided again until 2016. it is an opportunity for the republicans to put together a proactive message. i think it's a good time to be talking about our plans for the future in 2016. >> donny, you can look individually at the president and the way congress is viewed but take this all in tolg totta. 80% are angry or dissatisfied with the way things are going in washington. it's and old theme at this point. we see it in just about every poll. as robert said this is a pox on both houses. >> it's only three-point spread i think between the democrats and the republicans both on the negative side. statistically, not a big issue. i actually think that this is going to be a case of best human being wins a race. i think one could give an argument -- joe,
that people in the bay area love on the farmer's markets, sanitizing the environment is not going to make sense for agriculture. we can't go there. >> reporter: then there's the expense like testing irrigation water once a week. >> for a smaller farm where the owners are working full time just to keep the farm afloat, it's going to be pretty much impossible. >> reporter: but this man says -- >> we feel like it can be done. >> reporter: he is senior scientist with western growers an industry group that represents some of the biggest agribusinesses in the state. >> it doesn't matter what size your farm is or your distribution. it's important to protect your consumers. >> reporter: he says members of his trade group including large organic farmers already follow strict new safety guidelines. manure is banned. composting is regulated and water testing requirements are much stricter. >> i'm unaware of anybody going out of business so far. >> reporter: back in washington, dana just hopes an agreement will come soon. >> just want to help others and make sure that they don't go through what i we
in the past has signaled a real frothy environment with companies going public after only one year of being held private. it would be a real benefit for them to start exiting right now while the ipo market is hot. they could get a decent valuation, presumably. $5 billion is what people said they were looking at. which is sizable. >> the question that people have, some cultures are very adverse to private equity. the germans call it locus. >> some people say that they do a great thing, they by companies in bad shape, turn them around, put them back on the market. others think that they play the stock market cycles correctly. things are out of favor, they pick them up and sell them on the wave. >> they get paid millions of dollars to time that correctly. sometimes it works out, sometimes it does not, but it seems to be paying off for these private equity sponsors. >> in the case of j. crew, when they took it private or last time there were multiple lawsuits involved that there was somehow collusion to get it at a cheaper price. those kinds of lawsuits are not entirely unusual, they do happen
dissonant. with that part of your thinking going in? that you wanted to create this environment that was not like happy feel-good music? the whole job from my point of view is to take you up in space with ryan and the lead character. if she was feeling overwhelmed, we needed the audience to feel like that. you look at everything you could do. always following the story and taking the audience on the journey. a let me ask you about being composer nowadays. did you think as a kid you were going to grow up and be a composer, or do you see that as the best outlet for you to now?ss creativity in music >> the main music was a thing from very young. anded to love songwriting that kind of thing. and in their early 20's i got my first job with a film composer. it was only when i started moving music around that i realized what is it could do to a story and this light went on. it after youte see a video or sometimes after you see a clip? >> sometimes you have a few thematic ideas. for me, it is always when the movie is there and you can see the performances. all of these different things
thoughts about the investing environment right now. are these sectors the ones that are responsible for the profits? >> a big chunk of it. another piece of the equation is -- there was not , lot of bad weather last year so the claims they faced should be lower. thank you so much. we appreciate that look into berkshire hathaway. we are a few minutes from the opening bell. we have your top 10 traits. keep it right here on "in the loop." ♪ >> will come back. you are "in the loop." i am alix steel. bloomberg television is on the markets. scarlet fu has the latest. >> durable goods came in a little bit better than anticipated. the nasdaq futures are still up slightly. the s&p rose above its closing high but it was unable to hold onto that game yesterday -- gain yesterday. is still stronger, but cutting off its earlier level. imf put out a statement -- the ukraine notified the imf and the imf is ready to respond. we will continue to monitor that story as well. we are on the markets again in 30 minutes. >> let's count down to the open with your top 10 stocks. scarlet stays with us and ol
the ones that are more adapted to those environments to succeed. >> reporter: if you think it's just a central valley problem, think again. >> large dust cloud. >> reporter: in december 1977 california was in the middle of a major drought. strong winds near bakersfield scoured the topsoil creating a huge dust storm. it shut down highways, shut down utility towers, damaged property and killed livestock. the plume rose 5,000 feet and like a tidal wave spread hundreds of miles as far as sacramento. >> that topsoil was shipped up here and just dumped everywhere. >> reporter: in that topsoil, valley fever spores. dr. neil flynn was on duty at a sacramento hospital. >> we experienced several hundred cases of "cocci" here in sacramento from that dust storm. >> reporter: it killed 6 and spores can now be found in chico and redding. as for lauer, she knows -- >> something in the air. >> reporter: -- and all it takes is a gust of wind. sharon chin, kpix 5. >> a few cases of valley fever were reported in the bay area back in the '70s. it even killed one of the great apes at the san francisco z
, everyone. "bloomberg surveillance." tomorrow, we will talk leadership with a business environment that is the 2014 leadership commodity. look for that tomorrow on bloomberg surveillance. >> our guest host is bob nardelli. let's get to some company news now from the files of "hobart west." target, procter & gamble, giving some p&g products less product placement in its stores. amazonmes after p&g let set up shop in the warehouses, allowing them to order products faster. falling for the first time in a decade, the company had just over 431,000 employees after last year. a 10% drop the last time this happened was 2002. coming as ibm tightened costs and to try to break seven straight quarters of falling revenue. telekom wants closer ties with germany's biggest carriers in markets like romania. netherlands, they have artie said that their german unit will introduce the new offer in the spring. course within bloomberg surveillance this morning we have seen headlines from ukraine and russia. vladimir putin, russia, flexing his muscles, the president ordering an urgent drill for troops ac
drive change and drive improvement. it gives them that opportunity, in a calmer environment. >> cash is a factor in that. you can always get cash. you can leverage something, ight? if there is a cogent strategy -- >> you are able to get cash. >> it is costly. but you can do it. >> the mob might lend you money. >> but when you are meandering around a bunch of strategies and a lost customer base, it is very difficult. >> if you are doing restructuring with jcpenney or another company, is there a point beyond which you just say, ok, it is not worth salvaging here, we're just going to shut it all down? where is the tipping point echo -- where is the tipping point? >> you know, jcpenney has artie crusted, but that is a qualitative thing you have to go through. thed to consider what is in best interest of stakeholders. when you are dealing with the company that is burning through 'slot of cash, the board fiduciary duty is to debtors -- i'm sorry, to creditors, as opposed to just shareholders. that is sort of the switch. in the restructuring world, once you get into the point -- >> the shar
by the biological parents. i don't have a problem with that. if all you are donating is the healthy environment in which the traits that belong to two biological parents are to grow, that seems okay to me. stuart: it will be taking a bit further, won't it? you are getting designer babies. >> now allow anonymous and oregon donation. it deprives the offspring of knowing their biological parents. will not even consider this. donate or over him. so is a kid doesn't know who the dad or mom is. what o you need to know that for? it is the key to who you are spiritually, medically. stuart: i am with you all the way. i'm not sure i see a way of banning it and stopping it when it gets to that kind of situation. how do you stop that? i'm going to touch on one of your favorite subjects. social media apps. you are not a fan of social media, but in this case social media is organizing tyrus. surely you are relaxed an and to some aspects of facebook are terrific, won't you? >> no, i won't. if you can't bear to get on the phone or pass a handwritten note to get it done, is this even a real call? literally you
, the gist of it is the keystone pipeline effect would have very little impact on the environment. but yet they have still come out saying this report was bias. saying it was handled properly and sometimes was more rigorous than required. this thing hands down, it will certainly get built. stuart: very strict. >> you don't want it shipped. which would be ridiculous. stuart: it would be ridiculous. come on, charles. charles: build it and you can export it. stuart: you say he will do that. charles: i think so. stuart: senator harry reid calling the horror stories untrue. not so fast, listen to the senator on the senate floor yesterday. >> she works, she has maintained a number of part-time jobs, has a masters degree and then she says once it was passed, she said i saw the writing on the wall and so did the companies i work for. stuart: the senator joins us now from capitol hill. we just ran a clip from what you are saying on the show yesterday. in the constituent hurt economically and i take it you object to calling her a liar. correct? >> absolutely. he cannot handle the truth. we have been
not performed well. there is a universal theme of a rising rate environment out there. i will keep saying until it registers. you cannot normalize retail unless you normalize growth and inflation. inflation has not been normalized. the wealth effect is supposed to be benefiting the consumers. >> didn't the inflation numbers come up to an extent? morelittle blip is transitory to begin with. there is no real demand. the only way we will get inflation is from cost push inflation. >> clearly we will not get it from the fed. >> thank you. ago told you five years that the bank of japan in england and the central banks would be pumping trillions of dollars -- we would be talking about bitcoin. we have to ask ourselves what is happening in the mechanism here, where inflation is not being treated. if the emerging economies are in their anticipation of future earnings growth, the u.s. stock market is very wrong. >> what will it take to get inflation? >> higher wages. 77% of inflation comes from wages. you think about, what is the biggest cost to all these employers? wages. not nickel or zinc. >> we could
at the entrance of the store. they make it a shopping environment. we know you love tesla. tesla is going down. the stock is up today. does he mean, or she, do they mean that the stock will go down? >> i do not have a comment on it. whether it will have a powerful battery to lower the cost of the model. can they make a battery? solar city. tesla invented a battery. who knows. local, chapultepec, a new high, i believe. nicole: the shareholders love to see it. it hit 579. up about 4%. just recently hit another high. do not forget, now they are offering shredded tofu. stuart: who saw $500 a share? nicole: a mcdonald's spinoff. you remember when. stuart: take a look at radioshack. the company is closing 1100 stores. now they have announced they are closing 1100 stores. is this a possible turnaround? liz: i do not think so. we have been talking about radioshack for years. i think the cost is way too much. stuart: the last comment from you. >> you go for doctors. stuart: welcome back, tracy. we thank everybody for participating. thank you. an attorney for lois lerner says she will only testify under
lifestyle. up couch environment was set for one-size-fits-all. it was affordable. in the world that rich is describing, it is increasingly less affordable for that 21-year-old to 30 five-year-old. >> walter, you covered telecom and media. what does the deal between dish and disney mean for google, apple, amazon? it >> these guys have to wonder about their long-term business plans in general. look at what the telecom companies are doing in terms of pocketing wireless usage. we had all of this debate from last week or two weeks ago, when comcast and netflix came to terms. if you are google and you want people to watch youtube or are thinking about a television type service. you are at a disadvantage, you do not control that. if i am verizon, as an example, i can extend my product to wireless. or these other guys will be at a disadvantage if they try to sell over the top. >> you have known these guys forever. i want you to ask the questions that you want to ask rich and walter right now. what matters to you when you look at the analysis on these companies? byfor me i am fascinated where wal
, senator, i agree that environment of low rates, low interest rates, especially when it prevails for a long time and we have had a long period of low interest rates, can give rise to behavior that poses threats to financial stability. and, therefore, we need to be looking at that very carefully. and we are doing so in a very thoroughfare way, i believe. there are a number of things that we are monitoring. measures of asset prices and whether or not they appear to be diverging from historical norms, namely it's hard but we're trying to spot any asset bubbles, price bubbles that might be emerging. we're looking at leverage which build up in leverage can be very dangerous to the financial system and pose stability risks. we're looking at trends in leverage. we're looking at credit growth to see whether or not that has potentially worrisome trends. in addition to that, we're looking particularly through our stress tests, at financial institutions and a low-interest rate environment. we have to worry about whether or not they're appropriately dealing with interest rate risk. we have been looking
that type of an environment. hopefully that will improve. >> great to hear your thoughts, daniel morris from tiaa-cref's asset management. >> thanks for getting up early, appreciate it. >>> still to come, the closing keynote address at the world congress. >> the keenly awaited speech right after the break. [ male announcer ] whether it takes 200,000 parts, ♪ 800,000 hours of supercomputing time, 3 million lines of code, 40,000 sets of eyes, or a million sleepless nights. whether it's building the world's most advanced satellite, the space station, or the next leap in unmanned systems. at boeing, one thing never changes. our passion to make it real. ♪ >>> welcome back to the show. facebook and samsung have been in the main newsmakers so far at this year's mobile world dmong barcelona. the social network ceo defended his what's app acquisition and attention turns to data and cloud computing ahead of ib ibm ceo's keynote address. jon forte is live, what should we look out for? >> reporter: this should be big data day here in barcelona. we've had cisco ceo john chambers, joe tuche from emc m
. we can come back tomorrrow. and we promise to keep it that way. driven to preserve the environment, csx moves a ton of freight nearly 450 miles on one gallon of fuel. what a day. can't wait til tomorrow. ♪ >>> you talked about the nasdaq being up big and this is one of the reasons. take a stock like omni vision technologies and they reported that a number of people didn't expect anything good because people thought they would lose apple business and china business, but it was much better than expected. they are looking for trading cash, and sound like yahoo!? it is a major change. and now what has been red hot is biotech. medivation, they ahave a cancer drug, and they say they will accelerate, but it is not. and the jaws are dropping on the analysts who were bull ish, and keep in mind that where you have moves in biotech where everything is up, and up, and up, and everything must be perfect, and when they are not, the stocks get hammered. >> and how do you guide people through that morass, the biotech morass and who is going to win and lose? >> well, you fry to have companies who
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